126: Introduction to the New Testament (NT Lesson 0)

January 3, 2015

Engaging Gospel Doctrine

 

 

 

 

In this introductory podcast preparatory to teach the New Testament in Sunday School, I:

  • Review the Sunday School lessons and approach
  • Explain the format of Engaging Gospel Doctrine this year
  • Provide recommendations for devotional New Testament reading
  • Provide recommended resources (also linked below)
  • Explain what you can do as listeners to help the podcast
  • Provide a long but hopefully entertaining explanation of how we got the New Testament
  • Conclude with some thoughts on faith and New Testament scholarship

 

You can access my Lesson Notes here (or PDF)

Here is a link to my A Brief History of the Bible

 

Recommended Resources

Harper Collins Study Bible

Oxford Study Bible

ESV Study Bible

The Kingdom New Testament

The New Testament and Other Christian Writings: A Reader

Bible Apps: You Version, Logos, Olive Tree

Supplementary Resources

Jesus Christ and the World of the New Testament

Search, Ponder, and Pray: A Guide to the Gospels by Julie Smith

The Life and Teachings of Jesus Christ

Kevin Barney’s Introduction to the NT post

Barney’s post on the Intertestamental Period

 

Thanks to James Estrada for postproduction and to Marshall McDonald for the new bumper music.

3 Responses to “126: Introduction to the New Testament (NT Lesson 0)”

  1. Michelle Says:

    Hi Jared, I am interested in some reference material that will provide feminist interpretations of the NT. Do you have any suggestions? Thank you.

    Reply

  2. SLSDM Says:

    I don’t see a link to your A Brief History of the Bible. Would love to have that. Thanks for all you’re doing.

    Reply

  3. Joe Says:

    jared, I’m reading the intro in vol 1 of the life and teachings of Jesus Christ. The authors argue that the gospels, mark and John in particular, could be eyewitness accounts. Is there scholarly consensus on this point, or do these LDS authors need to presuppose that for some reason? Also, they include several deferential caveats , such as saying that we’ll never know how Hebrews was written unless we find the autograph or the president of the church receives a new revelation. Is that rhetorical move typical of LDS scholarship, or only that published by Deseret?

    Reply

Leave a Reply